Category: Time out

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Eden Camp Modern History Museum, Malton

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Eden Camp

A couple of months ago some artefacts from the two World Wars fell into my path at work. They were valuable items and their owner wanted them to go to someone who would look after them properly. Business was very much combined with pleasure therefore, when I volunteered to take them down to Eden Camp Modern History Museum in Malton, North Yorkshire, on my day off. The items consisted of machetes, bayonets, and a sword, and getting them signed over to the museum’s curator only took a minute or two. Afterwards Heather and I were free to explore. I was born 15 years after WWII ended, but its ghost remained very much to the fore when I was a child because my father had fought in it and his father in WW1. My mother was in the military police and looked after female prisoners at a camp set up at Windlestone Hall in Co. Durham. Windlestone Hall is the birthplace of Sir Anthony Eden and it was sold off a couple of years ago to private buyers. Last year I took Mum out to lunch near there along with one of her army colleagues who had also been a guard at the hall during the war. I wrote to the owners beforehand and asked if there would be any possibility of Mum and her friend seeing the house again. They did ring me, but it was clear that they weren’t keen. Possibly this was because they’d received a massively bad press for picking up this enormous country pile for just 241k. I think they were a little suspicious of strangers. I hardly think that the price they paid is their fault (if I’d had the cash I would have would have been interested)  but the sale provoked local controversy. However if that had been my home I would have loved to have had someone in there who could properly tell me about its history, and talk about what each of the different rooms were used for while it was a POW camp.

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National Glass Centre and back to school…..

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Dancing on the roof

I’ve had a lovely weekend, spending Saturday afternoon with Heather, my friend Lyndsey, and her two little’uns at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. You will see I’ve written a review of the Centre for What’s Good To Do, and in it I mention the glass roof. It’s made of glass 6cm thick and strong enough to hold 460 people in one go. You know you’re safe on it, and yet it’s a very hard thing to begin walking over it, and it took us several attempts and a lot of squealing to get going. Once you’ve got used to it you can look 40’ below into the brasserie reception area and shop. I advise that the wearing of trousers is a strict necessity, steer clear of skirts and kilts – or if you do have to wear them make sure that everything is safely gathered in.